Skip to main content

Open Access Dense Cataract and Microphthalmia—New Spontaneous Mutation in BALB/c Mice

Download Article:
 Download
(PDF 1,923.8 kb)
 

Abstract:

We describe a new spontaneous mutation in BALB/c mice that causes abnormal phenotype, such as congenital cataract and microphthalmia. This abnormality was found to be inheritable because offspring with the same abnormality were produced by backcrossing the abnormal male to its normal female parent. Results of various crosses made to determine the mode of inheritance indicated that this abnormality is attributable to mutation of an autosomal recessive gene. Slit lamp examination of the mutant eyes revealed total lenticular opacity, disturbed typical iris pattern, and abnormal pupillary muscle development. Histologic changes in mutant eyes between gestation day 13 and postnatal day 1 indicated various eye and lens abnormalities, including microphthalmia; underdeveloped iris, optic stalk, cornea, and retina; degenerated lens fibers with lost fibrillar structure; and vacuoles of various sizes at the posterior border of the lens. Mild opacity of the lens was found to progress with age and became denser, resembling mature cataract, and occupying the lens completely at the age of six to eight weeks. We, therefore, temporarily designated this abnormality as dense cataract and microphthalmia, with the gene symbol dcm.

Document Type: Research Article

Affiliations: 1: National Centre for Cell Science, Pune University Campus, Pune-411 007, India 2: Advance Centre for Training, Research and Education in Cancer, Tata Memorial Centre, Navi Mumbai-410 208, India 3: Kelkar Nursing Home, Prabhat Road, Pune-411 004, M.S. India

Publication date: June 1, 2004

More about this publication?
  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

    Attention Members: To access the full text of the articles, be sure you are logged in to the AALAS website.

    Attention: please note, due to a temporary technical problem, reference linking within the content is not available at this time

  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Membership Information
  • Information for Advertisers
  • For issues prior to 1998
  • Institutional Subscription Activation
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
aalas/cm/2004/00000054/00000003/art00004
dcterms_title,dcterms_description,pub_keyword
6
5
20
40
5

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more