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Open Access Iridodialysis in a Rhesus Macaque: A Case Report

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Abstract:

During routine physical examination, a five-year-old male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was observed to have gaps in the right iris. Ophthalmic examination revealed inferior and superior iridodialysis with an anterior cortical cataract. The optic nerve head and fundus were normal. Uninvolved areas of the iris and anterior-chamber angle were normal on the basis of results of gonioscopy. Tonometry revealed normal intraocular pressure. The cause of the iridodialysis in this monkey's eye was not known. The animal had been housed individually since arrival due to requirements of the research protocol. Although the concomitant cataract supports a traumatic cause, there was no history of cranial or other ocular injuries. Trauma from fighting through the cage walls, self-trauma or falling inside the cage while under sedation cannot be ruled out. Multiple hematologic evaluations disclosed no abnormalities. This animal did not manifest behavioral abnormalities or any indication of pain. Therefore, treatment was not initiated. Intraocular pressure continues to be monitored at least semiannually.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: December 1, 2000

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  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

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