If you are experiencing problems downloading PDF or HTML fulltext, our helpdesk recommend clearing your browser cache and trying again. If you need help in clearing your cache, please click here . Still need help? Email help@ingentaconnect.com

Open Access Statistical Method for Characterization of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy by Use of Morphologic and Pathologic Measurements in Pigs (Sus scrofa domestica)

 Download
(PDF 67.4kb)
 
Download Article:

Abstract:

Background and Purpose: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is characterized by symmetric or asymmetric hypertrophy of the left and/or right ventricle. Morphologic and pathologic indices (MI and PI) of hearts were established for classification of HCM in pigs.

Methods: Fifty on-farm-performance-tested pigs (average body weight, 104.3 kg; age, 224.5 days) were randomly selected. Heart weight, length, width, heart-to-body weight ratio, and thickness of the cranial and middle portions of ventricular septum and left ventricular free wall were measured. Myocyte disorganization and necrosis, myocardial and endocardial fibrosis, and intramural coronary arterial occlusion were scored. Principal component analysis and stepwise regression analysis were used to establish MI and PI.

Results: MI was established by using the first principal component as the dependent variable and applying stepwise regression analysis. Hearts were classified as morphologically normal, suspicious, and hypertrophic according to the range of MI. The same statistical method was used to find PI. Hearts were classified as pathologically normal, moderately affected, or seriously affected according to the range of PI. Combining MI and PI, hearts could be classified into five groups: no hypertrophy with minor lesion (normal); hypertrophy but with rare lesion; no hypertrophy but seriously affected; suspicious; and hypertrophy and seriously affected (heart with HCM). Another 119 hearts were collected and classified. The variation of heart measurements was consistent with the original purpose of classification.

Conclusions: Using fewer measurements for identification of HCM objectively in pigs seems to have practical application.

Document Type: Research Article

Publication date: June 1, 1999

More about this publication?
  • Comparative Medicine (CM), an international journal of comparative and experimental medicine, is the leading English-language publication in the field and is ranked by the Science Citation Index in the upper third of all scientific journals. The mission of CM is to disseminate high-quality, peer-reviewed information that expands biomedical knowledge and promotes human and animal health through the study of laboratory animal disease, animal models of disease, and basic biologic mechanisms related to disease in people and animals.

    Attention Members: To access the full text of the articles, be sure you are logged in to the AALAS website.

    Attention: please note, due to a temporary technical problem, reference linking within the content is not available at this time
  • Editorial Board
  • Information for Authors
  • Submit a Paper
  • Subscribe to this Title
  • Membership Information
  • Information for Advertisers
  • For issues prior to 1998
  • Institutional Subscription Activation
  • ingentaconnect is not responsible for the content or availability of external websites
Related content

Tools

Favourites

Share Content

Access Key

Free Content
Free content
New Content
New content
Open Access Content
Open access content
Subscribed Content
Subscribed content
Free Trial Content
Free trial content
Cookie Policy
X
Cookie Policy
ingentaconnect website makes use of cookies so as to keep track of data that you have filled in. I am Happy with this Find out more